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Each Monday, executive director Sheri Daniels introduces a member of the Papa Ola Lōkahi hale.

Babette Lilinoe Galang, Traditional Healing & Complementary Health Director of Papa Ola Lōkahi, is one of six children born and raised in Kalihi where she still resides.  She enjoys working at POL, where she has been since 1997.

She also enjoys talking to people young and old, but especially with kūpuna, traditional and cultural practitioners, other native groups, and children. Babette keeps busy reading, working in the yard, shopping, eating desserts, and travelling, especially to Las Vegas where she can be found on the slots or at a Black Jack Table and eating her favorite Lappert’s Kona Coffee ice cream from the California Casino.  She enjoys eating local food as long as she doesn’t have to prepare and cook it.

Babette loves what she does and is more of an early bird than night owl; thus, you can find her in her office by 6:30am. 

Most of all, Babette hates talking about herself. Amene.

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Each Monday executive director Sheri Daniels introduces a member of the POL staff.KuTercia compressed 20171116 171253 

Tercia Ku was born in Hawai‘i, raised near Fairbanks, Alaska, graduated from Wai‘anae High School and University of Alaska, Fairbanks.  Most of her professional career has been spent in clinical research and public health settings.  She lives in a Hawaiian homestead community and is devoted to moving the needle in the Hawaiian health compass to effecting positive change.

Mirroring the health journeys of our communities, she will be sharing her personal story over the next few months.

Meet Tercia Ku.

“I love birthdays.  As long as they are someone else’s! 

I celebrated my birthday this past week.  A milestone.  Ugh.  Self-reflection. 

I feel healthy.  But according to “the experts,” I am obese (such an ugly word).

Starting the day after my birthday, I’ve committed myself to work on my daily habits:  eating better and moving more.  I am stating here and now that I commit to shed 20 pounds over the next 6 months.  Monthly, that’s 3.33 pounds and that feels manageable.  But weight isn’t everything, so I’m going to look at other metrics, too, to measure my success.

And I will be sharing my wellness journey—the triumphs and challenges—with you regularly.  I am now accountable to someone other than myself. 

I hope that you will stay connected as I document my journey to a healthier me!”

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Each Monday, executive director Sheri Daniels introduces the staff of Papa Ola Lōkahi.  Today, we feature two of our newest members, both students in public health:  Chevelle Davis (L) and Asia Olivieri (R).

Chevelle is born and raised on the Leeward side of O‘ahu in Ewa Beach and a graduate of ‘Aiea High School. She graduated from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa with her bachelor’s degree in Public Health and is currently in her second year of the Master of Public Health program focusing on Health Policy and Management. Chevelle intends to pursue her PhD in Public Health and earn a certificate in Public Administration next fall. Chevelle joined the Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship Program (NHHSP) ‘ohana in September and is honored to be able to contribute to Hawaiians pursuing higher education in health care fields. When Chevelle is not working or studying, she enjoys spending time with her family or island hopping with friends. Chevelle also enjoys international travel and experiencing different cultures.  

Asia was raised in Kailua and graduated from Punahou.  Asia feels privileged to have the opportunity to be a part of the E Ola Mau a Mau process and to work with such a welcoming ‘ohana. Through this experience, Asia realized she loves to work in health and public policy. She is currently completing her Bachelor's in Public Health at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.  She already plans to attain a Master's in Business Administration followed by a PhD in Public Health. When Asia is not working or completing school work, she can be found playing with her dogs, volunteering for ‘āina-restoration projects, or discovering new restaurants. 

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Kamahanahokulani Farrar returns to the Hawaiian health ʻohana as the Executive Director of Nā Puʻuwai, the Native Hawaiian health care system that serves Molokai, Lānaʻi and Kalaupapa.

 

She was raised in Kailua, graduated from Castle High School, attended undergraduate college at Pacific University in Oregon, and completed her Master’s degree at the University of Hawaiʻi.

 

She has lived on Leeward Oahu, in Washington, DC and now Molokaʻi. Her husband Deke Law is a Special Education teacher and they have three adult children. 

 

She enjoys crew, paddling and being out on the water. Her best childhood memories are with her ʻohana in Kona swimming, camping, and picking coffee, plums and ʻopihi.

 

 

 

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Papa Ola Lōkahi works with the five Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems that serve seven islands.  On Maui, Hui No Ke Ola Pono has offices in Wailuku and Hāna.  Meet the Hui’s executive director, Joseph Gonsalves, Jr.

Gonsalves has been at the helm of Hui No Ke Ola Pono since 2012, but he has worked in a variety of positions since he first joined the organization in 1993.

“Joey” was born and raised on Maui , graduating from St. Anthony Jr.-Sr. High School in 1985.  He received a B.A. from the University of Hawaii at Mānoa and is trained as a social worker.  Joey resides on the slopes of Haleakalā with his lovely wife Colleen and two children, La‘akea and Kala‘i.  This past February, the family was blessed with a grandchild, Lawai‘a. 

Joey continues to be passionate and committed to improving Hawaiian health and well-being on Maui.  His work in the non-profit sector and life, in general, is driven by a simple motto, Live Aloha.

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